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"We are the illusion". True dat, Mr. Beale.

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For online writing, when I find things I want to read, I either read them right that second or I schedule time to read them on my calendar. If they aren’t worth a calendar appointment then I don’t read them. If I skip or move the calendar appointment more than once, then I delete the unread reading.

Books, I just read whatever and whenever I feel like it.

I would also like a Read Less button, but to just summarize or bullet point online writing. I mean ChatGPT does it, but it would be nice to have that button right on the page as some things I def would prefer to be shorter.

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Matt, what a striking piece! Your descriptions resonate precisely with my experiences regarding books and reading. What matters most—as you observed—is recognizing a sort of "cognitive saturation" has occured, and we must then transform all the useful/enlightening stuff into creative/exploratory fuel.

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Thanks so much for sharing this, Matt! This is serendipitously (daimonically?) timed for me because as we near the end of the year I've been reflecting on the things I've taken in this year and how compulsive that process has felt at times. I'd been considering a new year's resolution restricting my reading in some way, and so the title and theme of this post feels like a good cosmic nudge to pursue that instinct! Thank you again for your work, and your generosity in sharing it 🙌

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Hm. A very Ecclesiastical thought.

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founding

This has also been my own experience. And yes, the key is a distillation, an attempt to intensify, instead of extending, one's reading.

At bottom we are always dissatisfied with what we are and do, and we think salvation is in a book we haven't yet read.

Horror fiction could also help to explore the question of what salvation can possibly mean when we who are looking for it (in books or otherwise) are stumbling, dazed and disfigured beings in a disfigured and tottering universe.

The abysmal absurdity of such a search (of which Nietzsche's "eternal return of the same" is a culmination) is apt to self-dissolve, momentarily revealing the absolutely unlooked-for: not something out there, but what we even now are.

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Dec 10, 2023Liked by Matt Cardin

The hundreds of books in my office are staring at me right now...

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I hope to never take synchronicity for granted. Funny to stumble my way here after you shared a poem that resonated closely with me. Reading less, and more specifically simplifying life, has been seeping into my mind in my search for my true desires. The reflection of my past thirty years has me spiraling on reoccurring patterns and themes brought about by those "clinging obsessions". I believe I am approaching clarity and wish all others on the journey safe travel.

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Love this!

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